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Wild Boar - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

So good they hunted it twice

I was in the British Museum when I noticed this mosaic pavement showing a Wild Boar being confronted by a hunting dog. …

Nuthatch - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Vogue

I love it when a Nuthatch strikes a pose!

Robin - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Joy, unconfined

Robins don’t just sing in spring, but when they do it really is a fantastic symbolic moment. Here’s one giving it its …

Great Crested Grebe - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

An inexperienced male

The female Great Crested Grebe at Stover Country Park has been making all the right moves. She’s been prostrating herself on their …

Blue Tit - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

11 grammes of joy

Blue Tits weigh 11 grammes, although it’s a little more when one’s fully laden with an egg. Try describing a Blue Tit: …

Great Crested Grebe - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Supplementing their diet

Great Crested Grebes eat fish. Here’s a shot from the weekend showing just that: What I didn’t know is that they supplement …

Great Crested Grebe - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

An unhappy face

Fish never look very happy when they’re about to be eaten. This Norwegian Topknot for instance, isn’t terribly amused at being caught …

Coot - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Running late

Having a family is a stressful time. It’s particularly difficult if you’ve laid six eggs and have to incubate them and turn …

Stonechat - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Stonechats on Trendlebere Down

A quick trip to Trendlebere Down turned into a long one. The Stonechats were active, perched on the highest viewpoint available. It …

Great Crested Grebe - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Great Crested Grebes

The pair of great Crested Grebes on Stover Country Park lake are getting frisky: They’re in full breeding plumage, with their spectacular …

Coot - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Nesting Coot

The scientific name of the Eurasian Coot is Fulica atra. There are currently ten species of Coot worldwide; there were eleven species, …

Male Chaffinch - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Chaffink

The word finch comes from the Middle English word fynch. This, in turn, comes from the Old English work finċ. And that? We can trace …

Dunnock - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Prunella modularis

I recommend looking. Seeing the ordinary and realising it’s extraordinary is a habit which can bring you much joy. This Dunnock is …

Great Crested Grebe - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Grebe action

A little bit of sunshine meant I got up with a spring in my step and hot-footed it to Stover Country Park. …

Treecreeper - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Treecreeping

I’m waiting for Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers when I see a familiar sight. It’s a Treecreeper. Lovely, aren’t they?

Nuthatch - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Hatching

Can you believe that a fossil Nuthatch has been discovered? It was found in Italy and was dated to 20 million years …

Blue Tit - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Blue Tits

The Blue Tit’s scientific name is Cyanistes caeruleus. Cyanistes is from the Ancient Greek World kuanos meaning dark blue, which is the …

Ruddy Shelduck - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Ruddy Shelduck

Followers of this blog will know my love for ducks. As soon as I saw this gorgeous ginger specimen, I knew what …

Ibis - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Egyptian Ibis mummy

The British Museum is full of curiosities. Here’s the Easter-Egg like sarcophagus of an Ibis mummy. It’s made of gilded wood and …

Cat Mummy - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Cat Mum

I love all the plunder in the British Museum. Some of the debate about returning treasures is so emotive it’s difficult to …

Ramesses II - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

A Night at the Ramesseum

A quick trip to the British Museum and a chance to photograph its largest Egyptian sculpture; what remains of a huge carving …

Roe Deer - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Reintroduced Roe Deer

The Roe Deer was a native species in England until 1800 or so. They came to Britain after the last Ice Age, …

Ruddy Turnstone - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

A messenger from the sands

There’s a Ruddy Turnstone in Knott End-on-Sea. Beautiful, aren’t they? Ruddy Turnstones breed in the far Arctic and along the Canadian coast …

Redshank - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

The warden of the marshes

There’s a flypast at Knott End-on-Sea and this Redshank is one of three heading down the estuary. I love to see them, …

Pied Wagtail - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Pied Wagtail

Pied Wagtails are one of my favourite birds to just sit and watch. Their hypnotic tail-wagging action is a mysterious behavioural trait …

Twite - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Two little Twite, sitting on a wall

I’ve spent this week honouring Twite, a wonderful, curious, much-overlooked bird. Twite live in weedy fields and moorland, or at least they …