Time flies like Hoverflies

I’ve become inordinately attracted to Hoverflies. Should I be worried?

Eristalis pertinax Hoverfly - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

This one is Eristalis pertinax. Apparently I should know that because of the dipped loop in the wing vein and yellow front and mid feet. Wikipedia says “the larva of Eristalis pertinax is a rat-tailed maggot and lives in drainage ditches, pools around manure piles, sewage, and similar places.” Similar places? I don’t want to go there, either literally or metaphorically.

After looking at its huge, extending mouthparts I’m glad I didn’t take a closer photograph. These were in Devon:

This one is a Parhelophilus from Devon. I adore those funky eyes; Hoverflies really understand how to accessorise:

Parhelophilus Hoverfly - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

Finally, Eupeodes luniger from East Sussex. It’s a common species of hoverfly distinguished by hook-shaped markings along the center of its abdomen:

Eupeodes luniger Hoverfly - The Hall of Einar - photograph (c) David Bailey (not the)

If you watch Hoverflies, time really does fly.

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