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Keep up with comments here:

  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Atlantic Puffin enthroned in Sea PinksThanks so much for your comment - how lovely to hear from you. Probably the best easy access to Puffins and Sea Pinks on Westray is still from the track to the Castle o' Burrian. There's now a new platform built just after Rapness Mill with a barrier which allows you great views, especially when they come back to their burrows in the evening. My best wishes to you and good luck in seeing them.
  • Lee bruce ( mrs) on Atlantic Puffin enthroned in Sea PinksBeautiful image as ever David we haven coming for 26 years set up a few exhibitions etc in our time including one called Heem . Now we are an over and am less mobile have you anywhere to suggest I might still get to see the puffins and pinks . Am not on my knees yet but unsteady . Lived your photos of westray connections . We built the cairn on the links .
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Arctic Terns and the desolate northI think you should plan another big trip Pat! :)
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on A trip to the ArcticsThanks so much Pat - much appreciated!
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on A juvenile Green WoodpeckerSounds like a wonderful experience Gabrielle. They're very wary birds, so any view of them is a joy.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Lovely Linnets in the gardenThanks for getting in touch, Becky. Birds die of all the usual diseases, similar to the ones we have cures for in humans. They suffer from viruses and bacterial infections, and have partners such as intestinal worms and fleas, mites, ticks and lice. They suffer from starvation, poisoning and thirst. They collide with buildings, get trapped by domestic cats, caught by raptors and simply die of old age. It's hard to tell why your individual bird has died, but there are plenty of possibilities.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on The Knowe o’ SkeaSkea is a great name, Robert. Thanks.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Sandwich TernThanks so much Sally. There's so much happening in their lives that we can't see because they live their lives at a completely different pace. I love being able to get an insight into it through these high-speed photographs.
  • Pat Nelson on Arctic Terns and the desolate northBesides seeing the terns, I'd like to come to Westray to see those rocks as well. I loved Orkney when I was there in 1992 and have always wanted to come back to my grandfather's birthplace. Not sure I'll make it, but I like following posts online.
  • Pat Nelson on A trip to the ArcticsWonderful shots. Such a graceful bird.
  • Gabrielle Page on A juvenile Green WoodpeckerYou can see quite a few of these dandy birds in our backyard. We have a good size area left to meadow so plenty of ants to tempt them in. Also fat balls for easy dining plus fresh water provided for everyone.
  • Becky on Lovely Linnets in the gardenYesterday we found a dead linnet in our Norfolk Garden. It was unmarked showing no sign of aggressive attack or injury. Can you suggest any reason why this beautiful little bird has died?
  • Robert Skea on The Knowe o’ SkeaBeautiful. Skea is my surname, from America
  • Sally Hallam on Sandwich TernHi David, Sandwich terns are great and your images are lovely. Particularly like the upside down one with your explanation of why it is doing that!
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Cuckoo and Meadow PipitThanks so much Clare. It's a wonderful thing to witness so I'm glad you've seen it happening.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on The big story of the Little EgretThanks so much Kathy. I'm glad my photographs are helping your art. Do keep in touch and feel free to share your completed images.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Wait for it to dive and then run like the clappersThat's great to hear Morna. I hope you had days full of wonderful experiences while there.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on SpugLovely. Yes, the word 'Spug' is ancient and shared by all the languages which have their root in Proto-Indo-European. The Greek word for Sparrow is from the Proto-Hellenic and the English word for Sparrow is originally from Proto- Germanic. Humans have had a long relationship with Sparrows, known them, loved them, and named them consistently for thousands of years. It's such a shame that they're now threatened and many people on Facebook post poor photographs of them asking what they are. We've broken our relationship with the natural world.
  • David @ the HALL of EINAR on Sandwich TernThanks so much Heather!
  • Heather Owens on Sandwich TernJust "Wow!"
  • Debbie on SpugI am currently in Monemvasia in the Peloponnesus area of Greece and the sound of spuggies surrounding our hotel Is absolutely wonderful. I have also discovered the Greek word for sparrow is spourgitis and I do wonder if this is maybe the origin of our word spuggie. I like to think so
  • Morna on Wait for it to dive and then run like the clappersJust come back from my first ever trip to Orkney. Thanks for your inspiration in bird photography!
  • Kathy Hurley on The big story of the Little EgretHi Your photographs are gorgeous .I never knew about the eye color.Where i live in Ireland there are plenty of birds in Tralee bay .Thanks for the photos i am doing some drawing so i needed some close up of the eyes .Ta
  • Clare on Cuckoo and Meadow PipitThanks for this information about meadow pipits and cuckoos. I have just seen it happening in a local woods and wasn't sure how common the behaviour is. You write interesting field notes.
  • Ian Phipps on GlossDIVE! DIVE! DIVE!